Past Talks

Past Talks

Charting The Next Frontier Of Gravitational Wave Astronomy With Pulsar Timing Arrays

03 June 2020 RTG "Models Of Gravity" Colloquium, Bielefeld (via Zoom)

Noise budget group in NANOGrav

16 April 2020 Union College (remote talk due to COVID 19)

The NANOGrav search for nanohertz gravitational waves

27 February 2020 University of Minnesota

physics colloquium

25 February 2020 Illinois State Univ

Astrophysics with the NANOGrav Pulsar Timing Array

18 February 2020 McGill University

Supermassive Black Hole Demographics In The Era Of Multimessenger Pulsar Timing Array Detection

18 December 2019 30th Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics, Portsmouth, UK

Pulsar Timing Arrays: The Next Window to Open on the Gravitational-Wave Universe

04 December 2019 University of Florida, Astrophysics Theory Seminar

Pulsar Timing Arrays: The Next Frontier of Gravitational Wave Astronomy

19 November 2019 NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Supermassive Black Hole Demographics In The Era Of Multimessenger Pulsar Timing Array Detection

08 November 2019 SESAPS 2019 (South Eastern Section of the APS), Wilmington, NC

Fast Radio Bursts: An Extragalactic Enigma

24 October 2019 Cornell University

Pulsar Timing Arrays: The Next Frontier of Gravitational Wave Astronomy

17 October 2019 Cornell, Department of Astronomy

An Update on the NANOGrav search for Gravitational Waves from SMBHBs

29 August 2019 University of Toronto (CITA)

The FRB Story (So Far...)

24 July 2019 Kumamoto University, Japan

Arecibo and the PALFA Pulsar Survey

23 July 2019 Kumamoto University, Japan

The North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational waves

19 July 2019 Bonn, Germany at the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy.

Pulsar Timing Arrays: The Next Frontier of Gravitational Wave Astronomy

10 July 2019 GR22/Amaldi13 in Valencia, Spain

Pulsar Timing: An Overview

11 June 2019 IPTA in Pune

A Mix of Updates from NANOGrav

16 May 2019 the EPTA meeting in Cagliari

Solar System Ephemeris Noise

13 May 2019 OzGrav Pulsar Timing Workshop, Melbourne, Australia

Fast Radio Bursts: Enigmatic Flashes in the Sky

02 April 2019 UC Berkeley Radio Astronomy Lab

Frontiers of Pan-Spectral Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics

27 March 2019 Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge

Frontiers of Pan-Spectral Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics

07 March 2019 University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Frontiers of Pan-Spectral Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics

21 February 2019 CCA, Flatiron Institute

Future Expectations for ALPACA in Pulsar and Transient Science

19 February 2019 Arecibo Futures Conference

Frontiers of Pan-Spectral Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics

12 February 2019 University of Mississippi

Frontiers of Pan-Spectral Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics

05 February 2019 Vanderbilt University

Black Holes Don't Suck

01 February 2019 Columbia University

Probing supermassive black hole mergers with pulsar timing

31 January 2019 Vanderbilt University

The FRB Story (So Far...)

30 January 2019 Penn State University

How the Universe Works: Black Holes Don't Suck

29 January 2019 Columbia University

Frontiers of Pan-Spectral Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics

28 January 2019 Carnegie Mellon University

Pulsar Timing Arrays: The Next Window on the Gravitational-Wave Universe

25 January 2019 Center for Computational Astrophysics

Frontiers of Pan-Spectral Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics

24 January 2019 University of Minnesota

Frontiers of Pan-Spectral Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics

16 January 2019 University of Virginia

Frontiers of Pan-Spectral Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics

08 January 2019 Queen's University, Belfast

Supermassive Black Holes In the Era of Multi-messenger Nanohertz GW Astronomy

07 January 2019 AAS Special Session, Beyond Light

Pulsar Timing Arrays: The Next Window on the Gravitational-Wave Universe

11 December 2018 University of Auckland, New Zealand

Multi-Messenger Demographics for Pulsar Timing Arrays

30 November 2018 UWM, Milwaukee, WI

The NANOGrav 11-year Data Set: New Insights into Galaxy Growth and Evolution

29 October 2018 Rochester Institute of Technology

Pulsar Timing Arrays: The Next Window on the Gravitational-Wave Universe

01 October 2018 Department of Astronomy, Cornell University,

Compact Object Genealogy Across The Gravitational Wave Spectrum

28 September 2018 Universtiy of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Detecting Low-Frequency Gravitational Waves with Pulsar Timing Arrays

18 September 2018 University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Search for Life in the Universe

17 August 2018 CollegeNow Professional Development Conference

REU student workshop on Gravitational Waves

12 July 2018 Dept. of Astronomy, Cornell University

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01 July 2018 GBT

Detecting Low-Frequency Gravitational Waves with Pulsar Timing Arrays

06 June 2018 PASCOS2018

Join Dr. Sarah Vigeland a post-doctoral researcher from Univerity of Wisconson-Milwaukee as she speaks at Case Western Reserve University durint the 24th International Symposium on PArticles, Strings and COSmology.

“Detecting Low-Frequency Gravitational Waves with Pulsar Timing Arrays”

06 June 2018 24th International Symposium on Particles, Strings, and Cosmology (PASCOS2018)

Are We Alone? The Search for Life in the Universe

24 May 2018 Tompkins County Public Library

Join Dr. Shami Chatterjee, Senior Research Associate of Cornell’s Department of Astronomy, for an interesting talk about the search for life in the universe.

Optical and radio observations of the binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1640+2224

23 May 2018 University of Washington-Bothell

Join Dr. Sarah Vigeland, a post-doctoral researcher from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee as she speaks at the University of Washington-Bothell about optical and radio observations of pulsar J1640+2224.

NANOGrav's sensitivity and the noise budget

17 May 2018 Green Bank Observatory, Green Bank WV

PSR J1946+2052: A Pulsar-Neutron Star System in a 1.9 Hour Orbit

14 May 2018 Bonn, Germany

Dr. Kevin Stovall will present at the 12th Bonn Workshop on the Formation and Evolution of Neutron Stars on PSR J1946+2052

Radio Futures III

03 August 2017

Several members of NANOGrav attended the Radio Futures III meeting in Berkeley, CA. Maura McLaughlin discussed the future of NANOGrav science as we move into the 2020s and Paul Demorest presented the current state of NANOGrav science as well as our requirements for success going forward.

Radio Futures II

03 August 2016

Several members of NANOGrav attended the Radio Futures II meeting in Baltimore, MD. David Kaplan introduced the Pulsars, Gravitational Waves, and Cosmic Bursts session with Dusty Madison, Paul Demorest, Froney Crawford, Sarah Burke-Spolaor, Xavier Siemens, Ryan Lynch, Jim Cordes and Scott Ransom presenting. Joseph Lazio also presented during the ngVLA and HERA sessions.

NANOGrav SPOT Presentation

18 November 2015 Palmer-Laakso Elementary

NANOGrav’s SPOT group is a cadre of NANOGrav students and postdocs who are trained in science communication and outreach for K-12 audiences. Joey Shapiro Key will be presenting at Palmer-Laakso Elementary in Los Fresnos, Texas on November 18, 2015.

News

The NANOGrav 12.5-year Data Set

The NANOGrav 12.5-year Data Set

We have recently released our latest, 12.5-year data set, which consists of observations from the Arecibo Observatory and the Green Bank Telescope on 47 millisecond pulsars. We have introduced two pulsars into this data set, J1946+3417 and J2322+2057, for which we have timing baselines over 2 years; however, our longest baselines are nearly 13 years in length and make our pulsar timing array sensitive to low-frequency, nanohertz gravitational waves. This data set has two varieties: a “narrowband” version, which is very similar in its form and construction to our previous data sets (the 11-, 9-, and 5-year data sets), and a “wideband” version, which is the first data set of its kind. The timing analyses of the data sets are mutually consistent, and we are in the process of analyzing these data for the presence of gravitational waves.

The data are available on our website, here!

The narrowband and wideband data set papers are available on the ArXiv.


Meet “Spikey,” a Possible Pair of Merging Supermassive Black Holes

“Spikey”, an exciting new supermassive black hole binary candidate, was featured in Scientific American. Spikey was observed by the Kepler space telescope, and shows an unusual symmetric flare. This flare is well explained by relativistic self-lensing in a binary system, when the smaller supermassive BH passes behind the bigger one. If the flare repeats in the upcoming months, the binary nature of the candidate will be confirmed. The paper was led by graduate student Betty Hu, and co-authored by NANOGrav post-doctoral fellow Maria Charisi.

Read more at Scientific American or read the full paper on the ArXiv.


NANOGrav Data Searched for Gravitational Wave Memory

Newly published results! NANOGrav searches 11-year data set for unique gravitational wave signature – gravitational wave memory.

Read more in The Astrophysical Journal.


Special Session: “New Results From The North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves”

Special Session approved, “New Results From The North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves”

235th meeting of the American Astronomical Society Honolulu, HI 5 January 2020

This Special Session will highlight advancements in the search for nanohertz gravitational waves using pulsar-timing arrays, and the exciting multi-messenger opportunities to probe supermassive binary black holes. The session will include three invited talks followed by a panel discussion.


Most Massive Neutron Star Ever Detected Found in NANOGrav Data

Summary: Astronomers using the GBT have discovered the most massive neutron star to date, a rapidly spinning pulsar approximately 4,600 light-years from Earth. This record-breaking object is teetering on the edge of existence, approaching the theoretical maximum mass possible for a neutron star. “Neutron stars are as mysterious as they are fascinating,” said Thankful Cromartie, a graduate student at the University of Virginia and Grote Reber doctoral fellow at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, Virginia. “These city-sized objects are essentially ginormous atomic nuclei. They are so massive that their interiors take on weird properties. Finding the maximum mass that physics and nature will allow can teach us a great deal about this otherwise inaccessible realm in astrophysics.”

Read more at the NRAO website.


Event Horizon Telescope

The NANOGrav Collaboration congratulates the Event Horizon Telescope team for their success in creating a spectacular first direct image of the supermassive black hole at the center of galaxy M87. NANOGrav members James Cordes and Shami Chatterjee are also members of the EHT collaboration pulsar working group, which focuses on finding pulsars around the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy. This measurement represents the culmination of a 10-year effort and a number of technological and scientific advancements, not least of which is the proof that supermassive black holes of millions to billions of times the mass of the sun are in fact the engines of intense gravity and light in the centers of many galaxies. For years astronomers have seen the “smoking gun” from these compact titans in the form of large-scale radio jets and intensely glowing X-rays, but the EHT result has delivered the first direct image of the heart of one of these objects. NANOGrav is involved in a long-standing effort to directly detect not just one, but two supermassive black holes in a tight orbit. This detection will be made not through their light, but through the effect of their gravitational waves on radio pulses from celestial clocks called pulsars.


Astronomers see galaxies merging throughout the universe, some of which should result in binary supermassive black holes. Credit: NASA
Pulsar Watchers Close In On Galaxy Merger History

For the past twelve years, a group of astronomers have been watching the sky carefully, timing pulses of radio waves being emitted by rapidly spinning stars called pulsars, first discovered 50 years ago. These astronomers are interested in understanding pulsars, but their true goal is much more profound; the detection of a new kind of gravitational waves. With a new, more sophisticated analysis, they are much closer than ever before.


The Dawn of Multi-Messenger Astronomy

NANOGrav congratulates our LIGO colleagues and their collaborators across the electromagnetic spectrum on another milestone of modern astronomy: the first detection of a merger of two neutron stars. This first detection of an object in both light and gravitational waves is a remarkable feat and demonstrates the unique power of uniting these two methods to explore our Universe.


Merging Galaxies and Gravitational Waves: From Mpc to mpc

Special Session approved, and contributed papers welcome “Merging Galaxies and Gravitational Waves: From Mpc to mpc”

229th meeting of the American Astronomical Society
Grapevine, TX
6 January 2017

This Special Session will highlight advancements in astrophysics in the low frequency gravitational waveband and will feature a mix of invited and contributed oral presentations and posters.


Gravitational Waves Pass through Pulsar Timing Array ( Credit: NRAO )
Gravitational Wave Search Provides Insights into Galaxy Evolution and Mergers

New results from NANOGrav – the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves – establish astrophysically significant limits in the search for low-frequency gravitational waves.


Congratulations to our LIGO Colleagues

NANOGrav congratulates our LIGO colleagues on their discovery of gravitational waves from a binary black hole system. This result is a major milestone, not only in the field of gravitational-wave astronomy, but in the history of science!


Gravitational Wave Astronomy Advances with New NSF-funded NANOGrav Physics Frontiers Center

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) $14.5 million over 5 years to create and operate a Physics Frontiers Center (PFC).